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Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
a country school system. it meant a student's ability in math science and reading let's look at the latest results map to see shanghai singapore hong kong the first three positions number one two and three respectively france in the uk number twenty five and twenty six to the total of sixty five countries measured in these surveys. science results showing much the same kind of results that east asian. school systems scoring the highest shanghai hong kong singapore once again number one two and three friends and the uk in mid twenties and the literacy results opening much the same thing with the station systems scoring the highest france and uk also in those middle rankings in the mid twenties. that's always the asian country's top the world rankings that's pretty clear european countries such as france and uk struggling to compete france in particular sliding down the ratings and rankings despite spending more on its goals then other countries in the and today we ask how to prepare today's kids for tomorrow's world and make sure they leave school with all the right skills with both those q
.n.a. we have more on the discovery that's just been recognized by the academy of science. >> using hair cells to help the blind see again, for this french scientist, the goal behind a decade's work, just recognized by the academy of science. >> our laboratory's innovation has taken a hair, cultivated its cells, and reprogrammed those cells to form cornea cells. >> the corneas protects the iris and the pupil. it can be destroyed in an accident, by burns, or infection. in such cases, the eye goes opaque, causing blindness. nowadays scientists are able to repair the cornea with grafts from donors, like those in this container. 42,000 people are currently awaiting for a cornea trance plarnt around the world, however, the number of donors pales in comparison. but grafting corneas from hair cells could bridge this gap. the next step, human testing. >> well, up may know that french cooking has been distinguished with world cultural heritage status from the u.n., but it's no longer the only country. the u.n. has given japan's cuisine the same honor. it uses seasonal ingredients, unique taste, t
it in a unique way. this is a show about science by scientists. let's check out our team of hardcore nerds. lindsey miran is a cia operative and analyst. tonight, high tech crime stoppers. shots fired in the night. cops pinpoint the crime scene. how do they do it? the new science of solving crime. crystal dilworth is a scientist. if you think wine making is old school, think good. the newest ways of making wine. >> a neuro scientist and i will phil tores, an entimologist. the by onic arm. see how it's more
and science over great britain attended this meeting. and he said. he's very prompt the ball falls on all of them wood education in the united kingdom this is something absolutely a very insistent that the minister biggest biggest cheer. and because it's the uk says a leading company in education especially in the higher education system. i am from higher education myself and by unnoticed. pros the stairwell and the tallest reduce the chosen most or the united kingdom. plus the ride this this and other countries also but yes it did of those gatherings expressed the their pride then it probably didn't throw that they have returned and there with him for the benefit of all comfort and. presents they gave them a bit of wood to smile and say you do. it was amongst the class to class and the present the route to his strategy. kazakhstan two thousand fifty. and that these new generation of specialists. all of them have c'mon go to english. and the present. it affected the staff and when there was no time when one hundred and no one thousand and five hundred people speaking english. without tha
'll talk about innovations that will change laughs. we'll look at hardware. this is a show about science by scin histories. kyle hill is an engineer, and he's investigating head-to-head combat and cutting edge technology that can help to detect a concussion before it's too late. >> lindsay moran is an ex-c.i.a. operative. she was packaging that can one day replace
science of portland state. and says the free syrian army is trying to scare the west against groups like al qaeda. there were 31 groups involved in the syrian conflict. the number may have increased. al qaeda sees an opening to carry out its agenda. so it is merely taking advantage of the situation in syria. but one has to be careful. you know the head of the fsa, he would say al qaeda to are rest room, audience to frighten the westerners to support him. what they are, the people that he's talking about are islamist groups. there's a range in these 31 opposition groups from liberal, indeed to extremely religious conservative in in between. >> the rebels ousted former president in the central african republic in march are under fire themselves. a u.n. security council prepares to discuss a mandate of african union and french troops operating. if the resolution is adopted the forces will be providing support and supplies. more from the capital. >> we have heard gun fire and mortar rounds as well. all over this city. pretty close to where we are in this hotel now. the city is deserted. peop
media. the store was opened on the computers and smash it. science labs reports said. i never write about it often at least we had this to austin on monday it's been ages i mean by that time the campus of us and some spoons allegedly belonging to an al qaeda and eight. the best of from the university hostel in september he was in it. most of the seventeen soccer world cup in twenty seventeen the chief executives' committee which met in the business at the outside but about half as the vaunted that this gene is dominant and yet had the odd it was because of azerbaijan and south africa. it may be the biggest soccer thought of it it gets posted the president said dr said this was of enormous importance for the time to bond point two billion people in sporting political and geopolitical tabs. this is the site. this is book be a big weekend for i need to thank the chief executives' committee but keeping the cross hamas and bombed in depth the bikes who was presenting on the same woke up from the federal industry minister and president of the all india football federation said. i actually
at mcdonald's anymore or burger king. none of the food tastes right. they had a science project to tell me how many people have food -- ieating good still eat chitlins. was 13.d smoking when i what is this stuff going on for? it is not making people live longer. it is making people live longer. the lifespan span in the united states is going up. sure what genetic modification has to do with that. if you are eating genetically modified foods, if you are eating foods from the supermarket, just from the produce section, the chances are you are not eating anything that is genetically modified. there is a long list of foods that are not genetically modified. the only ones that i know about for short that are available are the genetically out of five papaya from hawaii -- the only ones that i know about for sure that are available are the genetically modified papaya from hawaii. if you bought them from stateside supermarkets, they llyl come from genetica modified varieties. i have been told there are some squash that come from genetically modified varieties. the percentages, i have been told, are no
and rich curriculum including arts and music and science. that's what we're calling for here. we're one of any number of groups, student or parent, community groups that says we need a new school not fixated on testing, strategies that create winners and losers but we have to help all of our children achieve and succeed. that's why you see the largest coordinated group of action, 90 in all, set for different parts of time during the day today. >> with race to the top, one of the policies you think was a failure and has not improved the overall standing of american students. >> i think what happened was race to the top was too fixated on testing and not enough on teaching and learning. now, let me just be clear. race to the top is part of a $100 billion stimulus package that was really important to keep schools afloat during the worse recession since the great depression. what's happened, andrea, there's been too much of a focus on testing and on people in washington and in state capitals actually not listening to parents or to teachers who actually believe, for example, in the standards
the budgets are going. >> private industry science. >> you have a new one. >> you got it in. >> very good. >>> coming up next on "new day," newtown, connecticut, bracing for the release of 911 tapes from the deadly school shooting that happened almost one year ago. we'll have more on what you can expect. >>> and bill clinton's spreading out the tea leaves again. what did he say about his wife hillary and the chances that she'll run? the chances that she won't run? we'll try to decipher the code when we come back. ood things for the whole community: the environment, seniors, kids, and animals. that's why we created the share the love event. by the end of this year, the total donated by subaru could reach 35 million dollars. you get a great deal on a new subaru. we'll donate 250 dollars to a choice of charities that benefit your community. it feels good to be a helping hand. ♪ by the end of december, we'll be delivering ♪ ♪ through 12 blizzards blowing ♪ 8 front yards blinding ♪ 6 snowballs flying ♪ 5 packages addressed by toddlers ♪ ♪ that's a q ♪ 4 lightning bolts ♪ 3
of accession to the opening of the science lesson was on school nights eleven fifty a statement. they have dedicated their time and commitment towards the project and require minimal input from their teachers and students that she will take these projects to themselves and it seems that i did this i mean the only things i constantly keep having to maybe if i'm the least expected within days and the same intensity actual content i mean they actually did everything themselves. the drop in sessions to a successful behind the apartment thursday sessions that took a flop and friday i took it like finance advice and things that you've changed many people's perceptions of personal finance kind of opened their eyes to many ways to save them money. simple ideas which have helped them to think about the future. it helps to visit with old age of the guys will like. we need to wait for like a pretty sad that i confessed they see that face us how to conceive of it just helps if you don't like it. asked about the delivery of the show today and it seemed theres free money saving expensive achieve great t
that use that to come in the real issues. and that he himself was in on a science. we sat at a time for a proper reaching into two paintings so as president went on to nintendo has led to a pressie she didn't in any chinese people when the tough look that great contribution of nasa manned and all too well to the public's eyes off the two countries. thank you very much indeed nice to nuke waiting for my chinese ambassador to south africa now attending to ukraine now with intel is as handsome as maddie's the gangsta governments is killing us is still going on that now for what's happening on the ground in key outlet still too dark respondents which of the state has been falling situation but they say that i will reach out to protest isn't government have that sowed some polish was feeling laurie's of the situation is everything going peacefully on the streets. it is the protests the demonstration continues behind me in the wings this two of the ukraine the protesters say they are determined to continue despite the heavily implied threat of severe action from the prying eyes out of the
all source analysts and combining these capabilities management,ion targeting, science and technology, bring to bear significant capability and these types off skills and capabilities, and others, they all brought of aneath the construct center concept. the integrated intelligence center construct, uniquely tied into our war fighting combat in and commands, part of the defense intelligence enterprise, provided full spectrum intelligence, synchronizing capabilities and eliminating redundancies. i will not stand here until you we will eliminate every redundancy, but i will tell you, it is one of the areas we have to try to work toward. understanding who is doing what to whom. as a longtime intelligence officer, you meet the demands of your customer. your customer is a commander. customerustom-made -- is the secretary of defense for the present, you answer that question. somebody else answers it for their boss, so be it. if somebody wants a call that redundant, so be it. inis the world we live in dealing with the here and now and the threats we face today and to keep us out of conflict,
places, less generally. there's no science to it. one of the things that was irresponsibly sold was the idea that a certain idea of stops and frisks would make the city safer. if you double it the city would be twice as safe. it was bizarre and shouldn't have been put out there. >> you mentioned the counterterrorism. some argue it's very successful since there's not been a major terrorist attack. what is it that needs to happen in that unit. i think it needs to scale back the activities. the unit targeted the communities, not based on a suspicion of wrongdoing. people were muslim. they went to the mosque, they went to a halal butcher shop. these are the things used to target communities. we need to go back it a place where people civil people when there was a reason to do so. they don't go around collecting everything from the halal food restaurants. >> be more focused on it. ooep if it leads to know terrorist attack. >> you are assuming there's a causation between the wide net. >> last year the uniform chief of the intelligence division said that they had not had a single in th
to help. and there was tons of evidence that began to yes merge, very good social science came out in the '80s and '90s that made that indisputable. i rethought my assumptions. what's the better way to help those that need to be helped. what's the better way to organization society so they can be free and flourish. and it wasn't hard from there to go to essentially where i am today, a believer in smaller government, more limited government, more individual freedom and liberty and also prevent the leviathan state, the big state, the entitlement state that liberals are so enamored of from crushing the institution, family and church and community and association that are the essence of american society. because that is one of the side effects of big government, and they are these treasured institutions that nurture the individual and they are the engines of american genius and american liberty. >> you see a lot of college students who are very idealistic. do you think some day the height will come on for some of them? and how do you talk to college students and say hey, here's where i
will do more of it in some places, a lot less of it generally but there is no science to it. one things that got irresponsibly sold is that a certain amount of stops and frifshingz would make the city safer and if you doubled that, the city would somehow be twice as safe. that was bizarre and should never have been put out there. >> you mentioned the counter terrorism formed after september 11th. some arguments, it's very successful especially since there has not been a major terror attack in new york city since then. what needs to happen with that unit? >> that unit needs to significantly scale back its activities. the unit has targeted entire communities, not based upon any suspicion of wrongdoing but simply because people were muslim, because they went to the mosque, because they prayed >> because they went to a halal butcher shop. these are the kind of things that have been used to target entire communities. we need to go back to a place where the police surveilled people when they had a reason to do so and don't just go around klegging those who go to the halal restaurants. >> if h
their parents. that is remarkable. >> and falling behind in scores on math. and science. engineering. >> 25 years ago, if you are a ,ropout, you could work a lathe a bowling machine. there are a lot of jobs. jobs, there is low level at fast food restaurants and hospitals. if you want a decent job, you have to use a computer. you have to speaking wish. all of these manuals, they are not in creole or portuguese. spanish. they are in english. today being a dropout is a tragedy. yound once you lose a step, lose a second and third and fourth step. >> and literacy. there is this amazing correlation. 80 for -- 85% of people in prison are illiterate. >> you and so many people i know use,e deceased, some in but all passionate about education. passionate. all have resources. all have a voice. all, one of the issues is recognizing the problem. i do not think it was clear 10, 20 years ago. when world war ii started, our army was smothered in the netherlands. we did not know how bad hitler was. he have to recognize that. now we say, there are 45 million kids in public school. decent them get a education
never told us very much. she's also a senior fellow for science and international affairs committee member of the policy board. she cofounded the center for the new american security think tank that you all know and she is a member of the aspen strategy group. so, zelikow is a professor of history at the university of virginia and is also the dean leading the graduate school of arts and sciences. >> i'm going to put that on my resume. i like that. soon after they became a trial and appellate lawyer in texas doing for mobile justice and civil rights work. there is so much more here. he was an adviser to secretary of state condoleezza rice. when i first met him, the council of the department of state he's a member of the president's intelligence advisory board and he was for president bush and president obama and he has written a number of books. germany unified. statecraft is a good one. he wrote that with condoleezza rice and most importantly he is a member of the aspen strategy group that he directed from 2,000 to 2003. i will sort by asking michele and fill up a few questions and
as a manageable medical condition. the science gives us great reason for optimism and hope. there are currently more than already safe and effective antiretrovirals drugs and combinations. researchers continue to develop new treatments. what is more, we're making progress to new medications and regimens that are longer lasting and simpler to use. far fewer side effects. those regimens reduce the amount of hiv in the body. that helps people living with hiv to stay healthy and live longer. we also know from the nih funding research, hiv transmission is drastically reduced when the amount of hiv virus in an affected person is reduced to undetectable levels. meanwhile, our partner agency, the fda, has approved new, rapid diagnostic test which can be used in a variety of settings to identify hiv in an infected individual. it might not be tested in a traditional health care setting. as we speak, nih grantees and scientists are exploring ways to treat hiv infections by administering anti-hiv antibodies. they have begun early-stage testing of an antibody that was effective in protecting human cells aga
attention to a new report from the nation's premiere scientific body, the national academy of sciences. we typically associate climate change with gradual, longer term problems. according to the academy, climate change could also pose a risk of rapid hard to predict environmental changes that have the potential to cause widespread damage in the near term. the report warns that the collapse of the polar sea ice could send sea levels soaring. the destruction of the coral reefs could cause mass extinction of sea life, the elimination of summer sea ice in the arctic could alter the world's weather patterns. these tipping points could happen suddenly. it's reckless to do nothing in face of these threats. if there is a 10% chance that these threats would happen, it's irresponsible for us to ignore it. dr. richard alley, one of the authors said, you can't see it coming. you can't prepare for it. congress is irresponsible if we don't take this issue seriously. to pass on our planet worthy of our children and grandchildren's future. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. . the n
proceeding. the most a man of science comedy johnny one of his descendants the t3 offer came as the heads of the major city providence. this is interesting to see if reason is simply about learning to balance reason i was fifteen and that is because of a fall it's an energy that i didn't feel anywhere else meditations on it but that's it sent the bike and was the no on can combine the museum fountain and art said sharif as well as cultural and spiritual capital. his boss that the government of the most useful. in fact they are close. it just a kitten intellectuals can post a few years many of them cover we'd university. no one had a fever and this was the world's first university in the lead and that has always attracted thinkers from far and wide including westerners. and while this is just upset me. so fast that the second study to be a book and the moon the moon. london irish medical professor noted in may means towards him though. historically fares is pride itself on its openness and tolerance safely say they voted that it opened at site to talk about gnosticism. and so did those th
recognizes the gentleman from alabama, mr. brooks, for five minutes. mr. speaker, the science space and technology committee recently held a hearing on healthcare.gov cybersecurity threats. our bipartisan expert witness panel included dr. frederick check, a computer science professor at s.m.u., dr. ruben, a computer science professor at johns hopkins university, david kennedy, former chief security officer of dibold incorporated and currently the principal security consultant for trusted sec, and morgan write, formerly with cisco security and now c.e.o. of crowd sourced investigations. now i'm not a cybersecurity expert, but i can read the words of those who are. the s.s.t. committee's hearing charter informs members that in order to fully use healthcare.gov, american citizens must input or verify highly personal information such as date of birth and social security numbers for all family members, household salary, debt information, credit card information, place of employment, home addresses, and the like. information that is a treasure-trove for cybercriminals and identity thieves
previously thought. read about that on our science page. all that and more is on our website newshour.pbs.org. >> ifill: and that's the "newshour" for tonight. on thursday, fast-food workers plan strikes in 100 cities across the country to protest low-wages. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. we'll see you online and again here tomorrow evening. for all of us here at the "pbs newshour," thank you and good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> this is bbc world news america. funding of this
in ottawa. general lawson graduated from the military college of canada with a bachelor of science degree as well as a master of science in the electrical can engineering and while attending the u.s. armed forces command staff college in montgomery, alabama, he completed a masters of public administration in at auburn. so he's thoroughly educated, i think it's fair to say. drawing on that record of service and expertise, general lawson has agreed to share his thoughts on the u.s./canadian defense relationship. secretary hagel just last week called this relationship one of the strongest in the world and, indeed, our canadian friends have fought alongside american troops in the volatile kandahar province in afghanistan at the height of the conflict, and they continue to deploy some 950 troops this a training capacity near kabul. just this past friday, they signed the canada/u.s. asia-pacific cooperation framework to increase our security cooperation in this important region. this will be done in the framework of the canada/u.s. joint board of defense. this is the context in which general la
behind their peers in other countries. the u.s. is now ranked 31st in math 24th in science, and 21st in reading. the assessment is based on a worldwide test taken last year by 6,000 american 15-year-olds. the test results show no improvement by u.s. students over the past decade. >>> time to show you some of this morning's headlines. "the wall street journal" says the number of banks in the united states are at their lowest level since the great depression. federally insured banks shrank to about 6900 in the third quarter, from a high of about 18,000. many smaller banks merged or simply collapsed. but overall bank deposits and assets are growing. >>> the "detroit free press" says a judge rules this morning on whether to allow the city's bankruptcy to proceed. about $18 billion in debt and liabilities must be dealt with. >> "the new york times" looks at soaring hospital charges. a day spent as an inpatient at an american hospital costs an average of more than $4,000. that is five times the cost in many other modern countries. a single stitch can cost $500. >> the
in agricultural sciences and earning his masters in business from delaware valley college, eric went to work for the pennsylvania department of agriculture. there he administered the rural youth grant program, led the county fair and agri tourism division and director for the central office in that department. he holds several leadership roles in the marcellus shale coalition, bringing together the two most important industries, energy and agriculture. eric is well deserving of this honor and we thank him for his leadership in the field of agriculture and agricultural education. thank you, mr. speaker and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from california, mr. waxman, for five minutes. mr. waxman: thank you very much, mr. speaker. on february 15, a small group of democratic members of the house joined together to form the safe climate caucus. we vowed to come to the house every day to talk about the defining environmental challenge of our time, climate change. today marks the 100th day we have spoken on
in the united states, saying it is the transportation and science committee -- as we move forward towards integrating drones into civilian life and capitalizing on the economic opportunities they offer, we must make certain that these aircraft's meet rigorous safety and privacy standards. the commerce committee said the hearing was already in the works before the amazon announcement on sunday. her knees from hartsdale, new -- bernice from hartsdale, new york on our support line. favor of using the drones because i just enrolled in a prescription d plan on medicare. i will get the best price if i use mail order to obtain my drugs. i take 14 prescription drugs. it is very difficult to keep things in order. in order to get the prescription i haveelivered on time, to call two weeks ahead of time. it seems insurmountable. however, if i saw that i was running out of drugs and they could be delivered in a half hour, it would be most helpful. i think for old ladies on prescription d, it might be a help. host: that is bernice from new york. this,ve probably heard but -- dylan from alabama, you are
, no matter how science fiction it feels to think about that happening, it could easily happen and it is our job to stop it. host: we have this tweet from calamity jane -- host: what do you say to that argument? syria rightis in now as a proxy terrorist. they are in all of these places doing bad things. they are in afghanistan. they have not invaded because that is not what these countries do. what these countries -- by these countries i mean countries like , they have proxy terrorists. they fund, promote, and train bad actors in their state and then send them out to other countries to destabilize. front page this morning of "the new york times." "jihadist groups gain turmoil across the middle east, planning violence to present new opportunities for jihadist groups across the middle east to raise concerns among american intelligence and counterterrorism officials that militants aligned with al qaeda could establish a base in syria capable of threatening israel and europe. -- europe." guest: that is absolutely true, especially in syria. you have a line from syria to iraq. that is how they get
is a better term, and industry science-based? >> i appreciate that question a great deal. the answer is we have put in place a number of new policy components that will begin to allow us to cover the entire. and it. i don't think we'll ever find the time when the american health sector diminishes in terms of imports and its reliance on technology. we are technologically driven in this country and that is a great asset in many respects, but a liability as well. it is an asset in that we've allowed the most technological means to be used in some cases that it made a difference. some people confuse our technology with our system, our marketplace. we have the best in the world. but we don't have the best sector in the world if you look at any performance criteria. i think we're the best technology in the world. a lot of people around the world want to access that technology. succumb to the united states to be able to do that. but what this law does and what i think a growing consensus, even in the private sector outside the law acknowledges that if we are really going to make a difference in t
do to a security wise. we have to look at this is a very real threat no matter how science fiction does to think about that happening. it could easily happen and it's our job to stop it. >> colon the gene tweets in represented hunter iran has not invaded another country for more than 200 years. they have a right to defend themselves. what do you say to that argument? >> guest: iran has invaded other countries through proxy terrorists. they are in a whole lot of places doing bad things. they are in afghanistan so they haven't invaded because that is not with these countries do. with these countries do is end when i say countries i'm in countries like afghanistan prewar and iran have proxy wars and a fund to promote and train bad actors in their state bad bad actors in their state and send them out to other countries to destabilize those countries and kill and maim people. husk of the front page of "the new york times" and don't know if you saw this story. groups gain in turmoil across the mideast. violence has presented new opportunities for jihadist groups across the middle east to
any surprise fees. ♪ it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. because what you don't know, can hurt you.urance. what if you didn't know that posting your travel plans online may attract burglars? [woman] off to hawaii! what if you didn't know that as the price of gold rises, so should the coverage on your jewelry? [prospector] ahh! what if you didn't know that kitty litter can help you out of a slippery situation? the more you know, the better you can plan for what's ahead. talk to farmers and get smarter about your insurance. ♪ we are farmers bum - pa - dum, bum - bum - bum - bum♪ >>> nelson mandela spent, what, 27 years in prison. much of that time was spent in the notoriously brutal conditions on robben island off the coast of south africa. few can recount the horror that nelson mandela had to endure. one man certainly can. this man was imprisoned on robben island while mandela was there. and he's joining us. thank you for coming in. tell our viewers what daily life was like for prisoners on robben island. >> so much so, that it was easy to forget the
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)